Introducing Bare Kind: inspiring a sustainable generation

In 2017, over 14.1 million people tuned in to watch Blue Planet II, and a revolution sparked as it highlighted the devastating magnitude of one particular planetary problem – plastic. The fallout can be seen daily, with pictures being shared showing the extent of the issue; sea turtles with straws lodged in their noses, birds tangled in plastic bags and fishing nets, and even sea horses clutching cotton buds – and it doesn’t stop there. Headlines continue to shock, like this one from 2018 stating that microplastics had been found in human faeces for the first time – meaning that they’re present in our own food chain.

Plastic itself can be used for good – it’s relatively cheap to produce, convenient, and can have some wonderful uses, but it’s how we dispose of it that causes the problem, and more specifically, how often and how much we need to dispose. Although eco-friendly alternatives are preferable, plastic that has a long term use isn’t the end of the world – if you’re going to use it lots, if it’ll last you, and if there’s really no other way. However, if it’s a single use plastic, things like straws, cling film, cups, plates and packaging, that’s an issue, as these will stay in the environment for hundreds of years after use. It’s worth noting that this issue won’t be fixed through individual actions alone, as this article on the wider issue sets out; but that doesn’t mean we have a free pass to ignore our own contributions. Every single straw refused is one less straw that may end up blocking a turtle’s airways.

It’s straws that have become the making of a company named Bare Kind – set up by Lucy Jeffrey, to help make the refusal of single use plastics a little easier, and a lot better looking.

 

 

Lucy set up the company in August of 2018, after feeling the need to do something with a purpose and take a more active role in promoting eco-friendly living. With the plastic threat being at the forefront of the media throughout most of the year, it seemed like a perfect time to set up shop in the sustainable market.

Currently, the website stocks a variety of stainless steel straws, complete with cleaning brush and bag, to enable you to slip them into your bag and refuse plastic ones offered to you. They’re also a nice alternative when faced with cardboard or paper straws, as these can go a little soggy – especially if you’re a slow drinker (or like me, are too poor to down drinks quickly.)

However, it’s not just a straw shop – the future of Bare Kind will see the introduction of reusable cutlery that can become a handbag and backpack essential, and even t-shirts made from recycled plastic bottles and offcuts from the cotton industry. The plans don’t end there though, as Lucy is constantly on the hunt and researching for new sustainable products to add, so that anyone can make a little change for the better. In addition to this, Lucy also blogs on current issues relating to plastics, recycling and eco issues around the globe. Her online presence through Bare Kind shares hints and tips to help reduce your plastic usage, and even encourages eco movements – like the #MyEcoResolution hashtag pioneered by Cara Delevigne on Instagram.

Another fantastic way that Lucy and the Bare Kind brand are making an impact is through their Ambassador scheme, of which I’m delighted to report that I’m now part of. By using the code ‘livewildlives’ at the checkout, you can steal yourself a wonderful 10% off the already fabulous price. It’s a small change that can make a big difference – you’re helping a small business, and saving the world at the same time. ‘It’s a great feeling to have a purpose in the work I am doing, and an even better feeling to see the positive response this type of work receives.’

You can keep up to date with Bare Kind in the following ways:

Shop & Blog

Facebook

Instagram

If you do choose to support Bare Kind – we’d love to see pictures! You can use the hashtag #BareKind, tag @bare_kind8 or show us on Facebook – and you can show me in all the usual ways (@livewildlives).

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